1982 – 1992 ECM Trouble Codes For Camaro & Firebird

1982 – 1992 ECM Trouble Codes For Camaro &
Firebird

Code Problem
or Description
Possible
Causes
12
No
reference pulses to ECM.

(All)


  • This
    code should flash whenever the “test” terminal is grounded
    with the ignition on and the engine not running.


  • If
    the engine is running and the code appears, this indicates that the
    ECM is not receiving any references from the distributor.
  • Faulty
    or loose EST connector at the distributor.
13
Oxygen
sensor circuit

(All)

  • Sticking
    or misadjusted TPS

  • Faulty
    wiring and/or connectors from the oxygen sensor.


  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.
14
Coolant
sensor circuit
(All)


  • If
    the engine is experiencing overheating problems, rectify before
    diagnosing further.

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connectors from the coolant sensor.


  • Faulty
    coolant sensor.
15
Coolant
sensor circuit
(All)



  • See note for code 14.

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connectors from the coolant sensor.


  • Faulty
    coolant sensor.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.
21
Throttle
position sensor (TPS) circuit

(All)

  • Sticking
    or misadjusted TPS plunger.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring/and or connectors at TPS and/or at the ECM.


  • Faulty
    TPS.
22
Throttle
position sensor (TPS) circuit

(All)

  • TPS
    misadjusted.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.


  • Faulty
    TPS.
23
Mixture
control (M/C) solenoid circuit

(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the M/C solenoid and/or at the
    ECM.


  • Faulty
    M/C solenoid.
23
Manifold
Air Temperature (MAT) sensor

(1985 and later vehicles)

  • Faulty
    MAT sensor.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections to the MAT sensor.
24
Vehicle
speed sensor (VSS) circuit

(All)



  • A code 24 should only be set while the
    vehicle is in motion. Disregard
    code 24 if set when drive wheels are not turning.

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.


  • TPS
    misadjusted.


  • Faulty
    VSS.

25
Manifold
Air Temperature (MAT) sensor

(1985 and later vehicles)
  • Incorrect
    voltage level of signal from the MAT sensor to the ECM.
    Should be above 4 volts
32
Baro
sensor circuit

(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Short
    between sensor terminals B and C or faulty wiring therein.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM (Terminals 1, 21 and
    22).


  • Faulty
    Baro sensor
32
EGR
system

(1985 and later vehicles)

  • Faulty
    EGR valve.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the EGR solenoid.


  • Faulty,
    loose and/or leaking vacuum hoses to EGR valve.
32
Digital
EGR circuit

(1985 and later 3.1L V6)

  • Faulty
    EGR valve.


  • Open
    or short to ground in EGR valve circuit.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections of EGR circuit.
33
Manifold
Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor

(All 1988 and later TBI V8, 1990 and
later TPI V8)



  • Low vacuum sensed

  • Faulty
    or disconnected vacuum hoses.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.


  • Faulty
    MAP sensor.
33
Manifold
Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor circuit

(1985 and later 3.1L V6)


  • High
    signal voltage, low vacuum.



  • Engine misfire and low unstable idle can set
    code 33.
  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections in the sensor circuit.
33
Mass
Air Flow (MAF) sensor
(1985
to 1989 vehicles, MPFI V6 and TPI V8)

  • Excessive
    airflow indicated.

  • Incorrect
    voltage level at
    terminal C on the MAF sensor. Should
    be 0.5 volts at idle, 4.7 volts at wide open throttle (WOT)


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the MAF sensor.


  • Faulty
    MAF sensor.
34
Vacuum
sensor circuit
(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM (Terminals 20, 21 and
    22).

    Faulty
    vacuum sensor wiring and/or connections.

  • Faulty
    vacuum sensor.
34
Manifold
Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor
(1988 and later TBI V8, 1990 and
later TPI V8)

High
vacuum sensed

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.

  • Faulty
    MAP sensor
34
Manifold
Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor circuit
(1985 and later 3.1L V6)
Low
signal voltage, high vacuum
  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections in the sensor circuit.
    An intermittent open will set code 34
34
Mass
Air Flow (MAF) sensor
(1985 to 1989 vehicles, MPFI V6 and TPI V8)


Low
airflow indicated.

  • Incorrect
    voltage level at terminal C on the MAF sensor.
    Should be 0.5 volts at idle, 4.7 volts at wide open throttle (WOT).


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the MAF sensor.

  • Faulty
    MAF sensor.
35
Idle
Air Control (IAC) circuit
(1987 to 1989 vehicles, MPFI V6 and
TPI V8)

  • Closed
    throttle engine speed is 125 RPM above or below desired (commanded)
    idle speed for 45 seconds.

  • See
    a dealer service department for trouble diagnosis.
41
No
distributor signals
(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the distributor.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the pickup coil.

  • Faulty
    vacuum sensor circuit (see code 34).
41
Cylinder
select error
(1985 and later vehicles)

  • Terminal
    D3 of ECM not properly grounded to engine.

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections to the ECM.
42
Bypass
or EST problem
(All)

  • If
    vehicle will not start, check wire leading to ECM terminal 12.

  • An
    improper HEI module can cause this code.
43
Electronic
Spark Control (ESC) system
(All)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections to ECM terminal L.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections from the ESC controller to the ECM.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections from the knock sensor to ESC
    controller.


  • Voltage
    at ECM A-B connector terminal B7 should be over 6 volts unless the
    system is sensing detonation.

  • Faulty
    ESC sensor and/or module.
44
Lean
exhaust

(All)

On
carburetor-equipped vehicles:


  • Faulty
    or sticking mixture control (M/C) solenoid.



  • Faulty or
    loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM, terminals 9 and 14.


  • Vacuum
    leakage at carburetor base gasket.


  • Faulty
    or loose vacuum hoses.


  • Faulty
    or leaking intake manifold gasket.


  • Air
    leakage at air management system-to-exhaust ports and at decel valve.


  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.

On
fuel injection vehicles:


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.


  • Incorrect
    fuel pressure.


  • Faulty
    or leaking throttle body gasket.


  • Faulty
    or leaking intake manifold gasket.


  • Faulty
    or loose vacuum hoses.


  • Water
    in fuel.

  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.
45
Rich
exhaust

(All)

On
carburetor-equipped vehicles:


  • Faulty
    or sticking mixture control (M/C) solenoid and/or wiring.


  • Fuel
    in evaporative charcoal canister and its components indicate rich
    condition exists.


  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.

On
fuel injection vehicles:


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections at the ECM.


  • Incorrect
    fuel pressure.


  • Leaking
    fuel injectors.


  • Intermittent
    bursts of fuel from the injectors at idle indicate a faulty TPS.

  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.
46
Vehicle
Anti-Theft System (VATS)

(1985 and later 3.1 V6)

  • Ignition
    key and/or starting procedures incorrect.


  • Open
    or short to ground in the VATS decoder module circuit.

  • Should
    be checked by a dealer service department if engine does not turn
    over.
51
PROM
problem

(All)

  • The
    PROM is located inside the ECM and is very delicate and easily broken.
    An authorized mechanic should do all diagnostic procedures.


  • PROM
    not properly installed in the ECM.


  • Faulty
    PROM.

  • Faulty
    ECM.
52
Fuel
CALPAK
(1985 and later vehicles)

  • CALPAK
    PROM not properly installed.

  • Faulty
    PROM.
53
System
over-voltage
(1985 and later vehicles, except
5.0L carbureted)

  • Voltage
    at ECM terminal B2 is greater than 17.1 volts for two or more seconds.

  • Faulty
    charging system.
53
EGR
control error
(1985 and later 5.0L carbureted)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections to EGR solenoid.

  • Faulty
    or loose vacuum hoses to EGR valve.
54
Mixture
control (M/C) solenoid
(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections from M/C solenoid to ECM.

  • Faulty
    M/C solenoid
54
Fuel
pump circuit
(1985 and later vehicles)

  • Voltage
    at terminal B2 is less than 2 volts for 1.5 seconds since last
    reference pulse was received.


  • Faulty
    fuel pump relay, circuit and connections.

  • Faulty
    oil pressure switch.
55
Oxygen
sensor circuit
(1982 to 1984 vehicles)

  • Faulty,
    loose or corroded wiring and/or connectors at the ECM.


  • Four-terminal
    EST wiring harness too close to electrical signals such as spark plug
    wires, distributor housing, alternator, etc.


  • Faulty
    or loose wiring and/or connections of various sensors.

  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.

55
ECM
(1985 and later vehicles)

  • Faulty
    ground connections to ECM.

  • Faulty
    ECM.
61
Degraded
oxygen sensor
(1985 and later 3.1L V6)

  • Faulty
    oxygen sensor.

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12 Responses to “1982 – 1992 ECM Trouble Codes For Camaro & Firebird”

  1. zack dickens says:

    my 1990 iroc z tpi 305 is not getting fuel. i checked the pressure from the fuel valve and it was good and i believe my injectors are clogged and i dont know how to un clogg them with out taking them out?

  2. mike says:

    how do i adjust a throttle position sensor on a 1992 TPI camaro 5.0

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